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Oklahoma State University
High Performance Computing Center

A unit in the Division of the Vice President for Research

2018 CADRE Speakers

Table of Contents

Keynote:

Amy Friedlander, NSF Office of Advanced Cyberinfrastructure

Plenary:

Dana Brunson, Oklahoma State University

Alison Langmead, University of Pittsburgh

Mary Larson, Oklahoma State University

Thomas Lombardi, University of the Virgin Islands

Breakout Sessions:

June Abbas, University of Oklahoma

Janet H. Ahrberg, Oklahoma State University

Phillip Alderman, Oklahoma State University

Daniel Andresen, Kansas State University

Patrick Baumann, East Central University

Kay Bjornen, Oklahoma State University

Susan Burke, University of Oklahoma

Kevin Dyke, Oklahoma State University

Jeremy Evert, Southwestern Oklahoma State University

Yu Feng, Oklahoma State University

Phillip Fitzsimmons, Southwestern Oklahoma State University

Mark Laufersweiler, University of Oklahoma

Evan Lemley, University of Central Oklahoma

Marla Lobley, East Central University

BJ Lougee, Federal Reserve Bank of Kansas City

Casey Lowry, East Central University

Hector Lucas, Southwester Oklahoma State University

Sarah Milligan, Oklahoma State University

Henry Neeman, University of Oklahoma

Juliana Nykolaiszyn, Oklahoma State University

Patrice-Andre Prud'homme, Oklahoma State University

Suzanne Reinman, Oklahoma State University

Xu Wang, Kansas State University

Paul Weckler, Oklahoma State University

Stephen Welch, Kansas State University

 

Keynote

Amy Friedlander

Deputy Office Director

National Science Foundation Office of Advanced Cyberinfrastructure

Topic: Why Cyberinfrastructure is more than Boxes, Wires, and Bits.

Slides: Available after conference.

Talk Abstract: As advances in science have come to depend upon computational methods and facilities, the importance of the cyberinfrastructure – the set of integrated resources and services provided by advanced computing, networking, software, and data – has similarly increased. Although it is tempting to focus on the complexities of these hardware and software systems, it is important to take a step back and recognize the importance of social organization, interdependencies, and enabling technologies, services, and institutions. The vision is to create the environment which will permit investigators to conduct their research from any location to any instrument or resource, pulling in relevant tools and data as needed and allowing them to focus on the content of their science and not on the means they employ to do so.

Biography: Amy Friedlander was named Deputy Office Director in the Office of Advanced Cyberinfrastructure, Directorate for Computer and Information Science and Engineering (CISE/OAC) in January, 2016 where she had served as Acting Deputy Division Director since November, 2014. Since joining NSF in 2010, she has led several strategic activities, one of which resulted in the widely-distributed report Rebuilding the Mosaic (2011), and was responsible for coordinating Foundation-wide activities for the Public Access Initiative.

Prior to her NSF appointment, Dr. Friedlander held positions in the non-profit and private sectors. Among other projects, she participated in the Blue Ribbon Task Force on Sustainable Digital Preservation and Access, funded largely by NSF; led the initial strategic planning for the Library of Congress’ National Digital Information Infrastructure and Preservation Program; and served as editor-in-chief of the ACM Journal on Computing and Cultural Heritage. At the Corporation for National Research Initiatives, she was the founding editor of D-Lib Magazine (www.dlib.org) and the author of a series of studies of the historical development large-scale technology infrastructures in the U.S.

Dr. Friedlander graduated from Vassar College, where she was elected to Phi Beta Kappa, and holds the M.A. and Ph.D. in History from Emory University and the M.S.L.I.S. from The Catholic University of America.  She pursued postdoctoral work on quantitative methods and computer-assisted social science research at the Newberry Library in Chicago, IL.

 

Plenary Speakers

Dana Brunson

Assistant Vice President for Research Cyberinfrastructure

Director of the High Performance Computing Center

Adjunct Associate Professor, Mathematics Department

Adjunct Associate Professor, Computer Science Department

Oklahoma State University

Topic: The State of CADRE (with Mary Larson)

Slides: The State of CADRE

Talk Abstract: Join Dana Brunson and Mary Larson as they describe the journey over the past two years to form the Coalition for Advancing Digital Research & Education (CADRE) at OSU, a multidisciplinary, campus-wide initiative that seeks to help computational and data-driven researchers connect with the resources, training, and people that can help them produce better, faster, and more thorough research than ever before.

Biography: Dana Brunson is the Assistant Vice President for Research Cyberinfrastructure, Director of the Oklahoma State University High Performance Computing Center (OSUHPCC), and an Adjunct Associate Professor in the Department of Mathematics and in the Department of Computer Science.  She also co-leads the OneOklahoma Cyberinfrastructure Initiative (OneOCII) and the XSEDE Campus Engagement program, which includes the Campus Champions.

She earned her Ph.D. in Mathematics at the University of Texas at Austin in 2005 and her M.S. and B.S. in Mathematics from OSU. She is PI on OSU's 2011 and 2015 National Science Foundation (NSF) Major Research Instrumentation (MRI) grants for High Performance Compute clusters for multidisciplinary computational and data-intensive research. She is also co-PI on Oklahoma's NSF Campus Cyberinfrastructure - Network Infrastructure and Engineering CC-NIE grant, "OneOklahoma Friction Free Network" (OFFN), a collaboration among OSU, OU, Langston University and the Tandy Supercomputing Center of the Oklahoma Innovation Institute.

Dr. Brunson is also a member of the Campus Research Computing Consortium (CaRC) Council, is an at-large board member for the ACM SIGHPC Education chapter, serves on Internet2’s External Advisory Group on Researcher Engagement, the Cyberinfrastructure program committee for the Great Plains Network, and Pittsburgh Supercomputing Center’s Bridges external advisory board.

Alison Langmead

Clinical Associate Professor

Director of the Visual Media Workshop

University of Pittsburgh

Associate Professor, School of Computing and Information, University of Pittsburgh

Topic: Successful Interdisciplinary Collaboration in the Digital Humanities (with Thomas Lombardi)

Slides: A Role-Based Model for Successful Collaboration in the Digital Humanities

Talk Abstract: In this talk, Alison Langmead and Thomas Lombardi will discuss their research group’s findings concerning the most effective ways to structure collaborations in the digital humanities. Sustained dialogue and collaborative work between humanists and technologists have a great deal to offer both fields of inquiry. However, we believe that these teams are best structured to account for four distinct collaborative roles: Humanist, Technologist, Data Steward, and Catalyst. These roles can be taken up by any number of people in a collaboration, but to ensure success, they all must be covered. After a discussion of the ways that these roles fit into a model of computing that takes into account the notion of ground truth, responsible data modeling, and sophisticated technical implementation, we will conclude by addressing one of the most pressing issues in digital humanities collaboration—that each participant must have a deep commitment to their own, unique engagement with the project, something that requires sustained effort and the maintenance of interdisciplinary respect.

Biography: Alison Langmead holds a joint faculty appointment at the University of Pittsburgh between the Dietrich School of Arts and Sciences and the School of Computing and Information. She serves as the Director of the Visual Media Workshop (VMW), a humanities lab located in the Department of the History of Art and Architecture that is focused on the investigation of material and visual culture—whether historical or contemporary—in an environment that encourages technological experimentation. Alison is also the Principal Contact for the DHRX: Digital Humanities Research at Pitt initiative, which represents a transdisciplinary network of scholars who use digital methods to study the ways in which humans interact with their environments, whether social or cultural, natural or human-created.

Mary Larson

Associate Dean for Special Collections

Puterbaugh Professor of Library Service

Oklahoma State University

Topic: The State of CADRE (with Dana Brunson)

Slides: The State of CADRE

Talk Abstract: Join Dana Brunson and Mary Larson as they describe the journey over the past two years to form the Coalition for Advancing Digital Research & Education (CADRE) at OSU, a multidisciplinary, campus-wide initiative that seeks to help computational and data-driven researchers connect with the resources, training, and people that can help them produce better, faster, and more thorough research than ever before.

Biography: Mary Larson is the Associate Dean for Special Collections and the Puterbaugh Professor of Library Service at Oklahoma State University’s Edmon Low Library, and she first came to OSU as the head of the Oklahoma Oral History Research Program in 2009. She has been working in areas that intersect with digital humanities since 1991 and is co-editor of the 2014 book, Oral History and Digital Humanities: Voice, Access, and Engagement (Palgrave Macmillan).

Thomas Lombardi

Assistant Professor

Computer Information Systems

University of the Virgin Islands

Topic: Successful Interdisciplinary Collaboration in the Digital Humanities (with Alison Langmead)

Slides: A Role-Based Model for Successful Collaboration in the Digital Humanities

Talk Abstract: In this talk, Alison Langmead and Thomas Lombardi will discuss their research group’s findings concerning the most effective ways to structure collaborations in the digital humanities. Sustained dialogue and collaborative work between humanists and technologists have a great deal to offer both fields of inquiry. However, we believe that these teams are best structured to account for four distinct collaborative roles: Humanist, Technologist, Data Steward, and Catalyst. These roles can be taken up by any number of people in a collaboration, but to ensure success, they all must be covered. After a discussion of the ways that these roles fit into a model of computing that takes into account the notion of ground truth, responsible data modeling, and sophisticated technical implementation, we will conclude by addressing one of the most pressing issues in digital humanities collaboration—that each participant must have a deep commitment to their own, unique engagement with the project, something that requires sustained effort and the maintenance of interdisciplinary respect.

Biography: Thomas Lombardi is an Assistant Professor of Computer Information Systems in the School of Business at the University of the Virgin Islands. He studies interdisciplinary computing in its many forms including digital humanities, networking, and bioinformatics. Most recently his research addresses the potential role of computation in the analysis of iconography.

 

Breakout Sessions

June Abbas

Professor

School of Library and Information Studies

University of Oklahoma

Topic: Teaching Technology in an MLIS Program: Issues, Strategies and Successes

Slides: Teaching Technology in an MLIS Program: Issues, Strategies and Successes

Talk Abstract: "Why is technology so important in an MLIS program? I won't use it in my job as a ___." This is a common statement heard by faculty who teach technology-rich courses. This interactive presentation will engage the audience in discussion about the issues related to teaching technology courses to students in an MLIS program. Dr. Abbas will discuss some of the common issues encountered when teaching students technologies that will be used in multiple information environments. The presentation will also include strategies used by four School of Library and Information Studies professors who teach courses in the organization of information, digital collections, introduction to information technology, information visualization, and other related courses. Success stories will also be shared. Following the presentation the audience will engage in a discussion about their approaches to teaching technology in the workplace and an opportunity to share their thoughts on which technologies are essential for information professionals.

Biography: Dr. June Abbas has been a Professor in the School of Library and Information Studies (SLIS) in Norman, Oklahoma since 2009, where she teaches courses on designing user-centered technologies, the organization of data and information, digital collections, management and online information retrieval. Her research focuses on the intersection between information and data, users, and systems, and how to design user-centered systems in multiple contexts. She was recently recognized nationally with 3 highly competitive, prestigious research awards recognizing her research contributions to the field of library and information science: the Kilgour Award from OCLC/ALA LITA (American Library Association) award given to those whose research has had significant impact on library technology and services (2016); the ALA YALSA Past Presidents' program award (with Dr. Kyungwon Koh) for their paper “Competencies Needed to Provide Teen Library Services of the Future: Survey of Professionals in Learning Labs and MakerSpaces”, presented at ALA Midwinter 2016 Young Adults Library Services Association forum; and OCLC/ALISE Library and Information Science Research Grant award for “A New Role for Libraries: Promoting Teens’ Safety and Security in the Digital Age” proposal in 2014.

Janet H. Ahrberg

Associate Professor

Digital Resources and Discovery Services

Oklahoma State University

Topic: Digital Public Library of America: Millions of Open Primary Source Resources (with Sarah Milligan and Juliana Nykolaiszyn)

Slides: Digital Public Library of America

Talk Abstract: This panel will provide an introduction to the Digital Public Library of American (DPLA), a national platform for archival discovery, with special emphasis on a newly formed Hub for contributing Oklahoma’s primary source material into this discovery system. Participants will be familiarized with utilizing DPLA in research or contributing content into the system through the OKHub.

Biography: Janet H. Ahrberg is a Metadata Librarian at the Oklahoma State University in the Digital Resources and Discovery Services Department. She creates and remediates metadata to enhance discoverability of the Library’s resources for its digital collections and the University’s scholarly research found in SHAREOK, the Library’s repository.

Phillip Alderman

Assistant Professor

Department of Plant and Soil Sciences

Oklahoma State University

Topic: Characterizing Drivers of Mesoscale Patterns in Oklahoma Wheat Yields Through Simulation Modeling

Slides: Characterizing Drivers of Mesoscale Patterns in Oklahoma Wheat Yields Through Simulation Modeling

Talk Abstract: Much is known about the ecophysiological processes underlying wheat yield and models exist which can integrate these processes to simulate yield well when management, cultivar, soil and weather conditions can be adequately characterized. Characterizing all of these factors accurately remains a challenge at a field scale, which has hitherto limited the scope of simulation analyses across geographic areas. However, the increasing availability of publicly available data (including satellite imagery, soil mapping, and automated weather network data) has greatly improved the feasibility of mesoscale simulation analysis. This presentation will review recent results from the Computational Agricultural Research Lab at Oklahoma State University which characterize spatiotemporal trends in Oklahoma wheat yields using an interface that links gridded weather and soil datasets directly with crop models. An overview of the simulation framework including the models and input data sets used, as well as an analysis of the drivers of yield and sources of uncertainty in simulations will be discussed.

Biography: Dr. Alderman's research program is focused on characterizing climate impacts on agricultural systems and on developing strategies to improve the resilience of these systems. He brings his past experience with dynamic simulation modeling of perennial forage and row cropping systems to address issues important to Oklahoma agricultural producers, such as heat and drought. His current research is closely linked to the Oklahoma EPSCoR project and uses simulation modeling to understand and improve the social and ecological resilience of agricultural systems to climate variability. Dr. Alderman seeks to build a collaborative, interdisciplinary team using modeling research to enhance agricultural systems in Oklahoma, the southern Great Plains and around the world.

Daniel Andresen

Professor

Computing and Information Sciences

Kansas State University

Topic: Birds-of-a-Feather-Session: XSEDE Region 4 Campus Champions

Slides: No slides.

Web Page: http://people.cs.ksu.edu/~dan/

Talk Abstract: The XSEDE Campus Champions program supports campus representatives as a local source of knowledge about local, regional and national High Performance Computing and Cyberinfrastructure information, including XSEDE resources. Campus Champions Daniel Andresen and Timothy Middlekoop would like to invite everyone - any current Campus Champion, possible Campus Champion, or those who are just curious - to join Region 4 Campus Champions (from AR, KS, LA, MO, NE, OK and TX) to discuss the program, what you can expect to gain from participating, short term and long term goals, and future visions for the program.

Biography: Daniel Andresen, Ph.D., is a professor of Computing & Information Sciences at Kansas State University and Director of the Institute for Computational Research. His research includes embedded and distributed computing, biomedical systems, and high performance scientific computing. Andresen coordinates the activities of the K-State researching computing cluster, Beocat, and advises the local chapter of the Association for Computing Machinery (ACM). He is a National Science Foundation CAREER Award winner, and has been granted research funding from the NSF, the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA), and industry. He is a member of the Association for Computing Machinery, the IEEE Computer Society, the Electronic Frontier Foundation, the American Society for Engineering Education, and has been an XSEDE Campus Champion since 2011.

Patrick Baumann

Media Services Librarian

East Central University

Topic: Maximizing Your Data: A Case Study on Statistics Collection and Reporting (with Marla Lobley and Casey Lowry)

Slides: Maximizing your Data

Talk Abstract: To improve data-driven decision making across all departments, East Central University's Linscheid Library recently overhauled its data collection process. This journey has allowed us to view our statistics in context and easily maintain data collection long-term to better support research. In this session, we will demonstrate our methodology, including our procedures for data rationalization, techniques for raw data manipulation, and the standardization of statistical reporting. The presentation will include a discussion activity that encourages participants to reflect on the effectiveness of their annual report process and/or data collection methods.

Biography: Patrick Baumann is the Media Services Librarian at East Central University.  He is liaison to the university Information Technology department and oversees electronic equipment at the library.  He went to the University of Texas where he graduated with a B.S. in Radio-Television-Film and an Master of Library and Information Science.  Among his current projects are implementing strengths finder analysis with library staff, and redesigning liaison training for new librarians.

Kay Bjornen

Research Data Initiatives Librarian

Oklahoma State University

Topic: A Three Pronged Approach to Data Literacy at Oklahoma State University

Slides: A Three Pronged Approach to Data Literacy

Talk Abstract: Academic libraries are faced with the challenge of adapting to the shift away from hardcopy collections housed in the library building, towards digital collections that are often accessed remotely. One of the roles that they are working to embrace is that of supporting the management of research data. Numerous surveys and studies have shown that the increased volumes and complexity of data has created a significant need and that this is a role that libraries are well suited for based on their traditional competencies with information seeking, organization and management. Exactly how to implement data management varies by institution with many struggling to help librarians become comfortable with unfamiliar technical skills. Oklahoma State University's Edmon Low Library is implementing a three pronged data literacy program to provide instruction for researchers, students and liaison librarians in order to create a more universal understanding of data issues. Services such as data management plan (DMP) consultations are currently available to researchers and students but to fully meet their needs, liaisons must be familiar with all aspects of data services since they serve as the first point of contact for most researchers. The presentation will describe instruction and services that are currently offered to researchers and plans for expanding instruction through multiple delivery methods. New plans for offering broad based instruction to liaison librarians are being developed in order to engage them more fully in data services at OSU.

Biography: Kay Bjornen has a background in research and data that started with a PhD in analytical chemistry and a career as an analyst and researcher in the oil and gas industry. She developed an interest in data and information management and completed a master's degree in library and information studies at the University of Oklahoma. She is now the Research Data Initiatives Librarian at the Oklahoma State University Edmon Low Library.

Susan Burke

Director and Associate Professor

School of Library and Information Studies

University of Oklahoma

Topic: Transforming Library Education

Slides: Transforming Library Education

Talk Abstract: Libraries are continually evolving to meet their communities’ needs, and today’s libraries are engaging their constituents in more ways than ever before. Many of these new directions include technology, data science, and information science solutions to information problems. As libraries expand into these arenas, library education must also transform to meet the educational needs of people entering the library profession. This talk gives a general overview of how the LIS field has evolved, and provides specific information about the evolution of the Master’s in Library and Information Studies (MLIS) program at the University of Oklahoma. All or most traditional aspects of librarianship now use technology and information science tools for cataloging, collection development, reference and user services, interlibrary loan, and more. But new librarians may also need web development, data analytics, GIS, digitization, and digital curation skills. Makerspaces are also becoming common from school to public to academic libraries, and many makerspace activities are based around technology. These are the types of tools that LIS programs are currently teaching. The private sector is recognizing how graduates from LIS programs have these practical skills, and an increasing number of our graduates are finding employment as information and data scientists outside of libraries.

Biography: Dr. Susan K. Burke is Director and Association Professor of the School of Library and Information Studies at the University of Oklahoma.

Kevin Dyke

Maps and Spatial Data Curator

Assistant Professor

Oklahoma State University

Topic: Signposting Oklahoma: New ways to navigate the cartographic collections of Oklahoma State University Library

Slides: Signposting Oklahoma: New ways to Navigate the Cartographic Collections of Oklahoma State University Library

Talk Abstract: Paper maps contain a vast amount of spatial data. Most of this data is unavailable in any other form. In this session I will demonstrate a number of projects underway in Maps & Spatial Data Services at Oklahoma State University's Edmon Low Library, all with the goal of increasing access to our collections of maps and aerial photographs. These projects include a spatial search interface, a tool for aerial photograph comparison, and the 3-D reconstruction of no longer existing campus buildings.

Biography: Kevin Dyke is Maps and Spatial Data Curator and Assistant Professor at Oklahoma State University's Edmon Low Library. He earned his Master's degree in geography from the University of Minnesota. He oversees the Oklahoma Digital Maps Collection, which is home to nearly 9,000 maps, as well as the paper collection of nearly 200,000 maps and over 100,000 aerial photographs. He also teaches workshops about web mapping, geographic information systems, and data visualization.

Jeremy Evert

Assistant Professor

Computer Science

Southwestern Oklahoma State University

Topic: Library Awesome Sauce for Undergraduate Research Movie (with Phillip Fitzsimmons and Hector Lucas).

Slides: Library Awesome Sauce Undergraduate Research

Web Page: http://faculty.swosu.edu/jeremy.evert/

Talk Abstract: Libraries are the awesome sauce! Unfortunately, Undergraduate researchers and their research providers are not always aware of just how awesome libraries are. This presentation focuses on the relationship between SWOSU libraries and undergraduate researchers. Phillip Fitzsimmons, SWOSU Reference and Digitization Librarian and Assistant Professor, will present some of the resources available at SWOSU, with a special focus on the Digital Commons platform. Hector Lucas, SWOSU Undecided Undergraduate, will present his research project, “Video Archiving Software Engineering Project Updates,” with a focus on how SWOSU libraries provide support. Jeremy Evert will discuss how the students and library have worked together, and how the SWOSU Computer Science program is benefitting from this project. Software Engineering projects include High Performance Computing Applications, use of Jupyter Notebooks with the NCAR Command Line, analytics, and web site design. The will present examples of work from the students, talk through some of the embargo and permission issues, and host a question and answer session.

Biography: Dr. Jeremy Evert is an assistant professor of Computer Science at Southwestern Oklahoma State University. Jeremy teaches introductory programming and source code management. He works closely with his students on undergraduate research projects. Jeremy has been successful in securing funding for equipment and student travel from Oklahoma NASA EPSCoR and the National Science Foundation. Jeremy has been a mentor for a Blue Waters Student Intern, and has also coached teams for the 2017 and 2017 Oklahoma High Performance Computing Competition. Jeremy was selected by the SWOSU students as the 2017 Faculty of the Year.

Yu Feng

Assistant Professor

Chemical Engineering

Oklahoma State University

Topic: Create your Digital Twin for Noninvasive Personalized Pulmonary Healthcare Planning

Slides: Create your Digital Twin for Noninvasive Personalized Pulmonary Healthcare Planning

Web Page: www.cbbl-okstate.com 

Talk Abstract: Nowadays, “personalized medicine” is starting to replace the current “one size fits all” approach. The goal is to have the right drug with the right dose for the right patient at the right time and location. An example of personalized pulmonary healthcare planning is the targeted pulmonary drug delivery methodology. However, traditional in vitro and in vivo studies are limited and not sufficient for the personalized treatment plan development purpose. Specifically, due to the invasive nature and imaging limitations, animal studies and clinical tests are lack of operational flexibility and will not be able to provide insightful high-resolution patient-specific data. Therefore, alternative methods should be developed to conquer these bottlenecks. Models based on the computational fluid-particle dynamics (CFPD) method play a critical role in exploring alternate study designs and provide high-resolution data in the noninvasive, cost-effective, and time-saving manner. The in silico methodologies can fill the knowledge gap due to the deficiency of traditional in vitro and in vivo methods, as well as make breakthroughs to pave the way to establish a reliable and efficient numerical investigation framework for pulmonary healthcare on a patient-specific level. In this presentation, the speaker will discuss the research progress and challenges on create the individualized digital twin for in silico pulmonary healthcare planning, with details on how to use computational fluid-particle dynamics to simulate inhaled aerosol transport, deposition, and translocation in human respiratory systems. Topics include: (1) Reconstruction of a whole-lung configuration to enable to simulation of inspiration-expiration full breathing cycle on particle transport and deposition; (2) Inter-subject variability studies for a more statistically robust numerical analysis, i.e., CFPD simulation with “error bars”; (3) Establishment of a multiscale model to bring the simulation from lung deposition to health endpoints, i.e., translocation in the whole body; and (4) how machine learning will pave the way to the future of in silico healthcare planning.

Biography: Dr. Yu Feng is an assistant professor in the School of Chemical Engineering at Oklahoma State University, and a center investigator in the Oklahoma Center for Respiratory and Infectious Diseases (OCRID). Yu Feng was a Research Assistant Professor and Lab Manager of the Computational Multi-Physics Laboratory (CM-PL) at North Carolina State University. He has also held an affiliation with DoD Biotechnology HPC Software Applications Institute (BHSAI) as a Research Scientist II. He completed his B.S. in Engineering Mechanics in 2007 from the School of Aeronautics and Astronautics, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou, China. He then joined the Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering at North Carolina State University and obtained his M.S. and Ph.D. degrees in 2010 and 2013 respectively. He founded the Computational Biofluidics and Biomechanics Laboratory (CBBL) at Oklahoma State University, focusing on developing and apply advanced CFPD models towards multiple applications associated with pulmonary healthcare. He has over 10 years of experience in modeling lung aerosol dynamics on ANSYS CFX and Fluent platforms, with 25 publications in top-rank journals of fluid dynamics and aerosol science. The overall goal of his research group is to understand and consider more underlying physics and chemistry and provide non-invasive, cost-effective and accurate numerical tools for multiple biomedical applications, e.g., health risk assessment, pulmonary drug evaluation and improvement, and non-invasive disease diagnosis. We make contributions to the medical world and human life by providing well-posed solutions to patient-specific pulmonary health problems using multi-scale modeling techniques. Outside of work, Yu Feng enjoys running (17 half marathons and 6 marathons so far), hiking, singing performance, photography, basketball, playing accordion, and cooking.

Phillip Fitzsimmons

Reference and Digitization Librarian

Assistant Professor

Southwester Oklahoma State University

Topic: Library Awesome Sauce for Undergraduate Research Movie (with Jeremy Evert and Hector Lucas)

Slides: Library Awesome Sauce Undergraduate Research

Talk Abstract: Libraries are the awesome sauce! Unfortunately, Undergraduate researchers and their research providers are not always aware of just how awesome libraries are. This presentation focuses on the relationship between SWOSU libraries and undergraduate researchers. Phillip Fitzsimmons, SWOSU Reference and Digitization Librarian and Assistant Professor, will present some of the resources available at SWOSU, with a special focus on the Digital Commons platform. Hector Lucas, SWOSU Undecided Undergraduate, will present his research project, “Video Archiving Software Engineering Project Updates,” with a focus on how SWOSU libraries provide support. Jeremy Evert will discuss how the students and library have worked together, and how the SWOSU Computer Science program is benefitting from this project. Software Engineering projects include High Performance Computing Applications, use of Jupyter Notebooks with the NCAR Command Line, analytics, and web site design. The will present examples of work from the students, talk through some of the embargo and permission issues, and host a question and answer session.

Biography: Phillip Fitzsimmons is the Reference and Digitization Librarian at Southwestern Oklahoma State University in Weatherford, Oklahoma.  He earned his M.L.I.S. from the University of Oklahoma in Norman, Oklahoma.  He is the administrator of the SWOSU Digital Commons.  His research interests include digital services for academic libraries with an emphasis on institutional repository administration and library reference services.

Mark Laufersweiler

Research Data Specialist

University of Oklahoma

Topic: An Introduction to Library Carpentry

Slides: An Introduction to Library Carpentry

Talk Abstract: This presentation will serve as an introduction to those not familiar with the Library Carpentry (LC) community and an update to those interested in the current status of LC. This talk will showcase the new website, highlight the status of the various lessons, and give an update as to where LC is currently with on-boarding with the Carpentries Foundation.

Biography: Mark Laufersweiler has always had a strong interest in computers, computing, data and data visualization. Mark started at OU as the Computer Systems Coordinator for the School of Meteorology from 1999-2013. Part of his duties included managing the real time data feed and maintaining the departmental data archive. He assisted the faculty, students, and staff in their courses to help promote the computing and data skills needed for the classroom and instruction based on current best (better) practices regarding research data and code development, what he refers to as research hacking. Since the Fall of 2013, he has served as the Research Data Specialist for the OU Libraries.

Mark is assisting the educational mission of the OU Libraries by developing and offering workshops, seminars and short courses, helping to inform the university community on data management plans and on best (better) practices for research data management. He is the university’s representative to the Carpentries Foundation and is an active Carpentry instructor and trainer. He is also involved with the Library Carpentry. One of his current projects is working to have OU join as an institutional member with the Open Science Framework (OSF) tool, hosted by the Center for Open Science.

Evan Lemley

Assistant Dean of the College of Mathematics and Science

Director of the Center for Research and Education in Interdisciplinary Computation (CREIC)

University of Central Oklahoma

Topic: Best Practices for Writing a Request for Proposal for High Performance Computing Hardware

Slides: Best Practices for Writing a Request for Proposal for High Performance Computing Hardware

Talk Abstract: Writing an RFP for the acquisition of HPC hardware is a painstaking process for which there often is no clear-cut template for success. This panel discussion features vendors and university faculty who share their successes and failures in the RFP process. Find out what questions you need to ask of your datacenter and purchasing departments as well as what technical information you need to gather before you start writing the RFP. Panelists will also discuss setting a realistic timeline and scoring vendor responses. Sharing of best practices for researching and writing proposals will culminate in a question-and-answer session.

Biography: Dr. Evan Lemley, is Assistant Dean of the College of Mathematics and Science and Professor in the Department of Engineering and Physics at the University of Central Oklahoma.

Marla Lobley

Public Services Librarian

East Central University

Topic: Maximizing Your Data: A Case Study on Statistics Collection and Reporting (with Patrick Baumann and Casey Lowry)

Slides: Maximizing your Data

Talk Abstract: To improve data-driven decision making across all departments, East Central University's Linscheid Library recently overhauled its data collection process. This journey has allowed us to view our statistics in context and easily maintain data collection long-term to better support research. In this session, we will demonstrate our methodology, including our procedures for data rationalization, techniques for raw data manipulation, and the standardization of statistical reporting. The presentation will include a discussion activity that encourages participants to reflect on the effectiveness of their annual report process and/or data collection methods.

Biography: Marla Lobley is the Public Services Librarian at East Central University in Ada, Oklahoma where she oversees the Outreach and Circulation departments. She received a BS in Human Development and Family Studies and a Master’s in Library Science from the University of North Texas. She has presented at the Texas Library Association Conference and the Oklahoma Library Association’s iCon conference and is a co-author of a chapter titled “Creative Problem Solving in Libraries: Budgets, Staff and the Lack Thereof” in the upcoming book, Creativity and Personal Growth for Librarians.

BJ Lougee

High Performance Computing Engineer

Federal Reserve Bank of Kansas City

Topic: The Past, Present, and Future of High Performance Computing at the Center for the Advancement of Data and Research in Economics.

Slides: The Past, Present, and Future of High Performance Computing at the Center for the Advancement of Data and Research in Economics

Talk Abstract: Federal Reserve Bank of Kansas City's (FRBKC) Center for the Advancement of Data and Research in Economics (CADRE) has transformed computing and, in particular, High Performance Computing for our researchers. With the added computational complexity of new economic models and the increase in the amount of data that our economic researchers use, CADRE needed to develop an environment where we could accommodate these new factors. With the move to cyberinfrastructure, technologists, librarians, data scientists, and research economists collaborate closely to facilitate better research. This presentation will describe a brief history of our computing environment and our move to cyberinfrastructure, including how CADRE Staff work together to accomplish these goals.

Biography: BJ Lougee is a computer scientist and High Performance Computing (HPC) Engineer in the Center for the Advancement of Research in Economics (CADRE) at the Federal Reserve Bank of Kansas City. He does research and development on, administration of, and training for the Bank's HPC environment. He has a particular interest in helping to drive the adoption of HPC techniques in the economics field.

Casey Lowry

Collection Services Librarian

East Central University

Topic: Maximizing Your Data: A Case Study on Statistics Collection and Reporting (with Patrick Baumann and Marla Lobley)

Slides: Maximizing your Data

Talk Abstract: To improve data-driven decision making across all departments, East Central University's Linscheid Library recently overhauled its data collection process. This journey has allowed us to view our statistics in context and easily maintain data collection long-term to better support research. In this session, we will demonstrate our methodology, including our procedures for data rationalization, techniques for raw data manipulation, and the standardization of statistical reporting. The presentation will include a discussion activity that encourages participants to reflect on the effectiveness of their annual report process and/or data collection methods.

Biography: Casey Lowry is the Collection Services Librarian at East Central University’s Linscheid Library, where she oversees periodicals, electronic resources, and interlibrary loan. She received her MLIS from the University of Oklahoma and has a BA in Film Studies from the University of Tulsa. She is currently working with colleagues to develop a new Digital Humanities Lab at ECU to be housed in the library.

Hector Lucas

Southwestern Oklahoma State University

Topic: Maximizing Your Data: Library Awesome Sauce for Undergraduate Research Movie (with Jeremy Evert and Phillip Fitzsimmons)

Slides: Library Awesome Sauce Undergraduate Research

Talk Abstract: Libraries are the awesome sauce! Unfortunately, Undergraduate researchers and their research providers are not always aware of just how awesome libraries are. This presentation focuses on the relationship between SWOSU libraries and undergraduate researchers. Phillip Fitzsimmons, SWOSU Reference and Digitization Librarian and Assistant Professor, will present some of the resources available at SWOSU, with a special focus on the Digital Commons platform. Hector Lucas, SWOSU Undecided Undergraduate, will present his research project, “Video Archiving Software Engineering Project Updates,” with a focus on how SWOSU libraries provide support. Jeremy Evert will discuss how the students and library have worked together, and how the SWOSU Computer Science program is benefitting from this project. Software Engineering projects include High Performance Computing Applications, use of Jupyter Notebooks with the NCAR Command Line, analytics, and web site design. The will present examples of work from the students, talk through some of the embargo and permission issues, and host a question and answer session.

Biography: Hector Lucas graduated from a small class of twenty-six at Ringwood High School in Oklahoma. Until now he has been undecided in his major at Southwestern Oklahoma State University. While he has considered majoring in both computer science and criminal justice, he will likely choose to major in mass communications, with a minor in business. He plans to graduate between 2020-2021. He enjoys editing photos and videos. He loves to see apparently random clips/pictures become a finished product. Hector has enjoyed the professional growth resulting from this project, and is excited to see the final product.

Sarah Milligan

Associate Professor and Head of Oklahoma Oral History Research Program

Oklahoma State University

Topic: Digital Public Library of America: Millions of Open Primary Source Resources (with Janet Ahrberg and Juliana Nykolaiszyn)

Slides: Digital Public Library of America

Talk Abstract: This panel will provide an introduction to the Digital Public Library of American (DPLA), a national platform for archival discovery, with special emphasis on a newly formed Hub for contributing Oklahoma’s primary source material into this discovery system. Participants will be familiarized with utilizing DPLA in research or contributing content into the system through the OKHub.

Biography: Sarah Milligan is the Head of the Oklahoma Oral History Research Program at the OK State University Library. She is responsible for administering the production, access, and preservation of the OOHRP's 1,000+ interview collection. She has worked extensively in oral history outreach, including to collection holders. Milligan is a DPLA OKHub project lead, inaugural president of the OK Archivists Association, Library of Congress' DPOE anchor trainer, and member of the 2011 Developing History Leaders @SHA.

Henry Neeman

Assistant Vice President for Information Technology

Research Strategy Advisor

University of Oklahoma

Topic: A Grant Proposal Writing Apprenticeship for Research Computing Professionals

Slides: A Grant Proposal Writing Apprenticeship for Research Computing Professionals

Web Page: http://hneeman.oscer.ou.edu/

Talk Abstract: In February 2017, the University of Oklahoma (OU) began leading a national Grant Proposal Writing Apprenticeship, to teach research computing professionals, from institutions across the US, how to write grant proposals, especially Cyberinfrastructure grant proposals, by writing a grant proposal together. Originally, this was going to be a small proposal for a few workshops, but the team was encouraged to expand that proposal to a full National Science Foundation CyberTraining proposal, which was submitted in February 2018, almost exactly a year after the Apprenticeship began. The proposal writing team has had a total of 67 members, mostly CI professionals, from 52 institutions in 31 US states and territories and 1 other country (Nigeria), including 10 participants from 10 MSIs, 12 participants from 12 non-PhD-granting institutions and 26 participants from 18 institutions in 13 EPSCoR jurisdictions. As far as the team is aware, this is the first time that anyone has ever attempted such an endeavor, which was fully successful, in the sense of submitting a Cyberinfrastructure grant proposal as intended (the outcome of which won't be known until at least summer 2018).

Biography: Henry Neeman is the founding Director of the OU Supercomputing Center for Education & Research (OSCER), Assistant Vice President for Information Technology - Research Strategy Advisor, Associate Professor of Engineering, and Adjunct Associate Professor of Computer Science at the University of Oklahoma (OU). He received his BS in Computer Science and his BA in Statistics with a minor in Mathematics in 1987 from the University at Buffalo, State University of New York, his MS in CS from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign (UIUC) in 1990 and his PhD in CS from UIUC in 1996. Prior to coming to OU, Dr. Neeman was a postdoctoral research associate at the National Center for Supercomputing Applications (NCSA) at UIUC, and before that served as a graduate research assistant both at NCSA and at the Center for Supercomputing Research and Development, also at UIUC. Dr. Neeman and his counterpart at Oklahoma State University, Dr. Dana Brunson, serve as joint co-leads of the Campus Engagement program of the Extreme Science and Engineering Discovery Environment (XSEDE), the umbrella organization over the National Science Foundation's national supercomputing centers. He also collaborates with the Advanced Cyberinfrastructure Research and Education Facilitators (ACI-REF) project led by Clemson University, is Co-PI on the Campus Research Computing (CaRC) project, serves on the steering committee of the Linux Clusters Institute, and recently completed a 5 year term on the National Science Foundation's Advisory Committee for Cyberinfrastructure.

Juliana Nykolaiszyn

Professor

Digital Resources and Discovery Services

Oklahoma State University Library

Topic: Digital Public Library of America: Millions of Open Primary Source Resources (with Janet Arhberg and Sarah Milligan)

Slides: Digital Public Library of America

Talk Abstract: This panel will provide an introduction to the Digital Public Library of American (DPLA), a national platform for archival discovery, with special emphasis on a newly formed Hub for contributing Oklahoma’s primary source material into this discovery system. Participants will be familiarized with utilizing DPLA in research or contributing content into the system through the OKHub.

Biography: Juliana Nykolaiszyn joined the Oklahoma State University Library in 2007. Nykolaiszyn serves as the Assistant Head of Digital Resources and Discovery Services, where she works closely with the library’s digitization, metadata, and web services units.

Patrice-Andre Prud'homme

Director of Digital Curation

Oklahoma State University

Topic: How can digital humanities and digital curation generate sustainable solutions?

Slides: How can digital humanities and digital curation generate sustainable solutions?

Talk Abstract: Digital humanities represents a conceptual and practical framework for understanding digital curation. It is highly based on interdisciplinary work, where the integration of digital technologies and archives can provide a lot to the success of digital humanities projects for research and teaching. The interconnectedness that exists between systems needs to account for the rapid technological changes and the new models of research and discovery that could emerge from the use and reuse of data for new types of analyses. Contextualization will play a critical role in the curation of those data to maximize research and readership in the humanities.

Biography: In his role as Director of Digital Curation at the Oklahoma State University Library, Patrice-Andre Prud'homme, Ph.D. provides leadership and management in the area of digital preservation, curation, and discovery of digital resources. He develops policies and procedures to maximize the value of digital assets. Prior to his coming to Oklahoma State University, he was involved in digital preservation, including the Digital POWRR (Preserving (Digital) Objects With Restricted Resources) grant, and recently served as an advisor in the POWRR Institutes, funded by the Laura Bush 21st Century Librarian Program.

Suzanne Reinmann

Director of Government Documents

Professor

Oklahoma State University

Topic: Tools that make sense of repositories for data storage and data reuse

Slides: Tools that make sense of repositories for data storage and data reuse

Talk Abstract: Researchers and students are often consumers of publicly available data sets. Researchers are also required by many funding agencies to identify a storage location that will make their data searchable and accessible for reuse. Repositories have been established for a variety of reasons and range from the general purpose institutional variety to large-scale, discipline specific types. This can make it difficult to identify the best option for data storage and can make searching for appropriate data sets very challenging. We will compare DataONE, Data-Planet and Data.gov and describe how each tool can be used to search for data sets on a large scale and to locate and screen data repositories.

Biography: Suzanne Reinman is the director for the federal depository collection at the OSU Libraries. She has a master’s degree in information science from the University of Michigan. Federal government agencies are publishing most of their materials online and are responsible for large open access data sets, supported at the agency level or at Data.gov, an open data repository. Government, university, and public interest organizations have been working to ensure that government data is accessible and preserved.

Xu Wang

Postdoc Research Associate

Kansas State University

Topic: Improving Genomic Prediction with High-Throughput Phenotyping

Slides: Improving Genomic Prediction with High-Throughput Phenotyping

Website: http://wheatgenetics.org/people/48-xu-wang

Talk Abstract: The convergence of smart sensing technology, robotics, and artificial intelligence is ushering a new era of digital agriculture to realize the potential of large agricultural datasets to enhance plant breeding, crop management, and sustainable agriculture. Undertaking the big data-driven genotyping-to-phenotyping challenges, high-throughput plant phenotyping (HTPP) can generate high geospatial resolution measurements of plants and enable high temporal resolution measurements through multiple crop growth stages, allowing a dynamic view of the plant phenotypic variation. In the Poland Lab at Kansas State University, we have been testing and implementing optimal ground- and aerial-based HTPP technologies to improve genomic prediction models for yield and agronomic traits prediction. In this presentation, two research projects will be highlighted. The first project provides an example of how to quantify a complex plant trait (i.e., the heading date in wheat) by HTPP and deep learning on “breeder-trained” datasets. The second project demonstrates data analytics for HTPP with unmanned aerial systems. The latter project will be presented along with case studies of sorghum height measurement and wheat lodging assessment. As more tools are available for HTPP to generate larger datasets, implementation of robust and efficient data analysis methods are in high demand to further advance genomic prediction.

Biography: Xu Wang, Ph.D., is a research associate in the Poland Lab of Plant Pathology Department at Kansas State University. His research includes high-throughput phenotyping for plant breeding and genomics and precision agriculture technologies.

Paul Weckler

Professor

Department of Biosystems and Agricultural Engineering

Oklahoma State University

Topic: Using Big Data and the Internet of Things (IoT) to Manage Tomorrow’s Agricultural Production Systems

Slides: Using Big Data and the Internet of Things (IoT) to Manage Tomorrow's Agricultural Production Systems

Talk Abstract: In the past, increases in agricultural production were directly linked to increased energy, land, and capital utilization. Mechanization was the primary factor driving increases in agricultural production in the early 20th century.  By the mid to late 20th century fertilizers, pesticides, and genetics were driving advancements in agricultural production.  Today, another wave of technological innovation known as Digital Agriculture is poised to revolutionize farming.  

In general, production agriculture has been slower and more cautious to adopt big data technology than other industries.  This presentation will discuss some of the promises and pitfalls related to Digital Agriculture, and then examine some real-world examples of current research and development work at OSU.  One example to be reviewed will be on-going efforts to create robust and intelligent control systems and sensors to help monitor, optimize, and manage autonomous agricultural machinery systems.  Integrated sensing for agricultural machinery control and automation is a complex and challenging topic.  Augmenting a priori spatial information with real time sensor data is needed to achieve the next level of automated agricultural machines.  A excellent source of a priori data is the Oklahoma Mesonet.  A recent project analyzed 21 years of historical weather data (~106 data files) from the Oklahoma Mesonet system.  The data examined the practicality of flying unmanned aircraft for various agricultural purposes in Oklahoma.  Current research is looking at how to best link real-time sensor data with the vast amount of a priori data.

Mobile, real-time agricultural sensors need "look ahead capability," centimeter-level resolution, and entire root zone coverage.  Most data points need to be geo-located and time stamped.  The difficulty of obtaining soil property data quickly and cheaply remains one of the biggest sensing challenges for digital agriculture.  Autonomous agricultural machines need to assess the terrain they are driving through and typically scan for obstacles such as wet or soft soil.   Soil trafficability is the capacity of soils to support vehicle travel.  Basic trafficability factors include, soil strength, stickiness, slipperiness and variation with weather.  In order to develop accurate variable-rate prescriptions for crop inputs like seed and fertilizer, it is necessary to estimate soil parameters such as; soil moisture versus depth, organic matter, pH, CEC, soil texture, nitrogen levels.  Issues involved with this data include collection speed, data accuracy (sensor reading vs. actual lab value), sensor resolution (temporal & spatial), local vs. wide-area (regional or global) calibration, etc.  These data sets quickly become very large.  Work is on-going with regard to algorithms and methods of data processing and analysis.
 

Biography: Dr. Weckler is a registered, professional engineer with over thirty years of experience in biosystems & agricultural systems engineering.  He is currently a Professor of Biosystems and Agricultural Engineering at Oklahoma State University.  His responsibilities include: teaching undergraduate and graduate level courses (including the capstone senior design project courses), and conducting interdisciplinary research and development in the area of mechanical system engineering, sensors, instrumentation and automation.  

Before joining Oklahoma State University, Dr. Weckler was on the faculty of California Polytechnic State University-San Luis Obispo.  His post-graduate experience includes engineering positions with the Electro Optical Systems Division of Litton Industries and with L-3 Aeromet Inc. involving the design, fabrication, calibration, field deployment and data reduction of airborne optical sensor systems.  Dr. Weckler currently serves as a faculty advisor for the OSU Engineers Without Borders chapter and has served as the ASABE student club advisor.  In recent years, he has done international engineering work in Mongolia, Honduras, Guatemala and China.  His areas of expertise include: instrumentation, sensors & controls, digital image/signal processing, electro-mechanical system design, electro-optical sensor systems, automated Smart Machines, food & crop processing, irrigation engineering, and complex system integration & testing.
 

Stephen Welch

Professor

Department of Agronomy

Kansas State University

Topic: Measuring crop canopy traits with microwave radar

Slides: Measuring crop canopy traits with microwave radar

Talk Abstract: Annual rates of gain in crop yields are far below those needed to meet global food needs at 2050. Accelerating progress depends on finding highly efficient methods for measuring plant traits in crop improvement programs. While great progress is being made in using image-based approaches, especially from unmanned aerial vehicles, these methods become limited when the canopy becomes too dense to see into. The work to be reported shows the potential to overcome this problem by using microwave radar to which plant canopies are moderately transparent. Exploiting this technology requires a combination of 3D modeling, microwave scattering calculations, and scattering inversion methods, all of which are computationally intensive (e.g. repeated pseudoinverse solving of 80K x 40K matrices for each plot). An overview of the computational methods will be included in the talk.

Biography: Dr. Welch is a theoretical plant modeler with expertise in gene network modeling, crop photothermal modeling, and methods for relating genotypes onto complex phenotypes.